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priority and yes, i have read the bill. >> -- taxes. >> please don't yell out, this is america, this is memphis, tennessee, take two aspirin and come back in the morning. >> reporter: boos and cheers greeted ed perlmutter. proof people are passionate when it comes to health care reform. >> i just appreciate the fact that you're all willing to take time to come out. thank you for exercising your civic duty of talking to your congressman. >> scenes like that playing out all over america. and it's not only the crowds losing their cool at these town hall shout downs. listen to georgia congressman david scott get fired up when the topic came up at a town hall meeting just last week. >> not a single one of you had the decency to call my office and set up for a meeting. okay. then do that! do that! but don't -- don't come and take advantage of what these individuals have done. you want a meeting with me on health care, i'll give it to you. >> well, next hour, we'll tell you why that may not exactly be true in this case and show you much more on this very heated exchange. much, much mo
on terror. the news starts right now. >>> we begin with america's ferocious debate over health care reform growing more unhealthy by the day. across the country we're witnessing town hall meetings on health care devolving into shouting matches worthy of a jerry springer episode with people lashing out over who ultimately pays the bill for millions of medically uninsured americans. >> the event remained largely civil. huge crowds with hundreds more gathering outside. >> when the republicans controlled congress and the senate, why didn't you introduce and pass health care reform then? >> my biggest fear is this is going to get rammed down our throats. >> do we look like mob? >> this doesn't look like mob this. looks like home. >> some estimated that as many as another 800 couldn't get in and were locked outside. >> won't even let us in. they blocked us out. >> my son has the right to live. >> no doubt about it. >> my son has the right to health care. >> you don't really think you're going to get that, ma'am, in this bill, do you? >> you have to do something. >> that's what i hear from the li
believe that elizabeth and i both agree that there needs to be comprehensive health care reform in america. but the kind of comprehensive health care reform is what really is going to be the most important item. and i hope that it's a bipartisan one that i think can be passed energy. >> larry: elizabeth, can that happen without the government being involved in a quazi insurance company of its own? >> we can pass health care reform without what is commonly referred to as a public option, which means to compete with your private insurers, with united health care or aetna or blue cross/blue shield, you would have the federal government offering you the option of insuring yourself through the government plan. i think it would be a huge mistake to pass any kind of reform without that public option. for a lot of reasons. one of the things we want to do is make certain we're providing to 46 million americans who are uninsured to 25 million who are underinsured, a way of getting reliable, transparent and cost effective, accessible -- cost accessible insurance. the way you do that is make certain y
the campaign is there is no red america, no blue america, no republican, no democrat. there is one america. tonight if what we are hearing is correct, if he says we are going to cling to the public plan no matter what, he is saying blue america wins. i'm the president of that america. this government-run plan doesn't have the support in the middle. that's why he is losing democrat support in the senate and thinking of trying to jam this through quickly with 50 votes. >> roy, do you think this is something they would go ahead with or maybe trying to float this idea to put pressure on everyone to come to some sort of agreement? >> i think that has to be part of it. just today gibbs said they hadn't decided in they were going to stop negotiating with the republicans. kyl said he wasn't going to whip up votes and grassley saying he might not support the thing he was negotiating for. all the signals were there and they weren't sure. when would they be sure? when the support of the american people drop to 29%? this is something they are putting out there as a threat they could pull back. it is a
in america. but the kind of comprehensive health care reform is what really is going to be the most important item. i hope that it is a bipartisan one that i think can be passed and energetically and have a great deal of support in the country. >> larry: elizabeth, can that happen without the government being involved in kind of a quasi insurance company of its own? >> can we get -- pass health care reform? we can pass health care reform without having -- what is commonly referred to as a public option. which means that to compete with your private insurers, united health care, cigna, blue cross/blue shield, you would have the federal government offering you the opening of insuring yourself through the government plan. i think it would be a huge mistake to pass anything -- any kind of reform without -- without that public option for a lot of reasons. one is that one of the things we want to do is make certain that we are striving to 46 million americans uninsured 25 million underinsured, a way of getting reliable transparent and cost-effective accessible -- cost accessible insurance and the w
and missiles and on the heels of news that three more americans are now being held in a country america does not have a diplomatic relationship with, iran. does this pump up one dictator and embolden others? we're joined now by pedavid gern and peter brooks. david, i want to start with you. it's almost impossible to ignore the message that it's sends to north korea and others that may be on shaky ground with the u.s. the next time they have u.s. citizens in their custody they can use them as bargaining chips to talk with high-level people, rewarding bad behavior. how do they keep that from happening? >> erica, i think this has a more important message to the world, and that is that america is a country that cares about its own, it will go to great lengths, a former president will fly around the world to bring back two innocent brave americans to reunite them with their families and that individuals matter in this country. and this situation, we didn't give anything away. it's not as if there was a bargain or a negotiation. rather, we had a brutal regime that captured these two young women. a
sotomayor was sworn in this morning as america's 111th supreme court justice. chief justice john roberts administered the judicial oath during a public ceremony in the high court's conference room. it was the first time the court allowed tv coverage of a swearing-in ceremony. in spanish harlem, there was an enthusiastic viewing party. sotomayor is the first hispanic supreme court justice in u.s. history, and she's only the third woman to serve on the nation's high court, which is set to hear arguments in september, on september 9th in a campaign finance case. and coming in october, cnn will present "latino in america," a look at how hispanics are reshaping politics, business, schools and culture. in october only on cnn. >>> and there's been an alarming spike in iranian executions. the cause is unclear but it seems to have coincided with the re-election of disputed president ahmadinejad. president mahmoud ahmadinejad. amnesty international said there have been no less than 115 executions in iran in the past 50 days. now, it says, 24 of them occurred in one single day. we haven't been able
evening, everyone. i'm don lemon. >>> we begin with america's ferocious debate over health care reform growing more unhealthy by the day. across the country we're witnessing town hall meetings on health care devolving into shouting matches worthy of a jerry springer episode with people lashing out over who ultimately pays the bill for millions of medically uninsured americans. >> the event remained largely civil. huge crowds overwhelmed the meeting hall with hundreds more gathering outside. >> we're very, very scared. >> when the republicans controlled congress and the senate, why didn't you introduce and pass health care reform? >> my biggest fear is this is going to get rammed down our throats. >> this is a mob. do we look like a mob? >> this doesn't look like mob this looks like home. >> some estimated that as many as another 800 couldn't get in and were locked outside. >> won't even let us in. they blocked us out. >> my son has the right to live. >> no doubt about it. >> my son has the right to health care. >> you don't really think you're going to get that, ma'am, in this bill, do
are proud and happy that bank of america actually has a solution to help them out with their cards. i listen. that's the first thing i do is listen. you know what, what happened? what put you in this situation? and everyone's situation is different. we always want to make sure that we're doing what's best for our cardholders. i'll go through some of his monthly expenses, if he has a mortgage payment, if he pays rent. and then i'll use all that information to try and see what kind of a payment he financially can handle. i want to help you. bank of america wants to help you through this difficult time. when they come to you and they say thank you, aj, for helping me with this problem, that's where we get our joy from. that's what motivates us everyday. >>> the safe return of journalists euna lee and laura ling, former vice president gore this morning said laura's mother had some soup waiting for her. like any family meal, it's the family part that counts the most. for laura, it's her mother, father, husband, and sister, fellow journalist, lisa ling. >> proud would be an understatement. the lit
and then continue? >> i agree with you. i hold no for much of the practices of the insurance companies in america. don't get me wrong. we have to fix the pre-existing condition situation and we don't shout at my town hall meetings. i agree with you. we have to address the issue of people with pre-existing conditions, people who are unable to attain health care insurance and we should do it through risk pools and it is going to cost money. go ahead. >> and the other thing is, mayo clinic that you talked about having good practices is one of the ones that president obama has cited as being the type of medical facility that we should pattern our health care reform on. >> they just don't agree with his proposals. go ahead. >> they suggest some of the same things that the mayo clinic is doing and i have some experience with the mayo clinic. my husband, who was on medicare, chose to stay on regular medicare. so he had the choice of going to mayo. i chose an hmo with medicare. i am wondering, when we have that choice with our government-provided medicare, why are so many people opposed to a government-p
and privileges bestowed upon the occupant of this house but few mean as much to me as the chance to award america's highest civilian medal to the recipients that are here today. this is a chance for me and for the united states of america to say thank you to many so of the finest citizens of this country and of all countries. the men and women we honor today have led very different lives and pursued very different careers. they are pioneers in science and medicine. they are gifted artists and athletes. they have made their mark in the courtroom, in the community, and in congress. what you nighunites them is a b that most, forgive me to those of you who are not american but what we consider that most american of beliefs, that our lives are what we make of them, that no barriers of race, gender, or fiscal infirmity can restrain the human spirit. and that the truest test of a person's life is what we do for one another. the recipients of the medal of freedom did not set out to win this or any other award. they did not set out in pursuit of glory or fame or riches. rather, they set out guided by pass
in essence magazine present black in america, reclaiming the dream, tonight at 8:00 only on cnn. >>> coming up today at 4:00 eastern, we have a special report covering america. what's in it for you. we want to hear your thoughts on health care. and already we are, you're posting your comments on our block at cnn.com/fredricka or my facebook. people ask why are they going bankrupt. your comments and questions 4:00 eastern time. right now, time for "your money." >>> the future of your gas prices, did speculators drive oil prices sky high, and could it happen again. >>> the stock market is on a roll. how you can cash in right now. >>> and all those burgers, fries and burritos add up. we have the real cost of all those calories. >>> get ready, it's time to talk. "your money." i'm ali velshi. >> i'm christine romans. your health care still very much in limbo. >> dana bash has been camped out in the halls of the capital through all of this. she joins us with an update. hi, dana. they're headed out now for summer recess. without either the house or the senate passing health care reform. let's star
's all somehow inevitable and that the only way for america to get ahead is for places like elkhart to be left behind. you hear that argument sometime in washington. but i know and you know that the truth is exactly the opposite. i'm here because i believe our ability to recover and to prosper as a nation depends on what happens in communities just like this one. the battle for america's future will be fought and won in places like elkhart and detroit and goshen and pittsburgh, south bend, youngstown, in cities and towns across indiana and across the midwest and across the country that have been the backbone of america. it will be won by making places like elkhart what they once were and can be again, and that is centers of innovation and entrepreneurship and ingenuity and opportunity. the whirring engines of america. we can't afford to run the race at half strength or half speed. if we hope to lead this century like we did the last century, we have to create the conditions and opportunities for places like elkhart to succeed. we have to harness the potential, the innovative and cr
again, but it did. citigroup, bank of america, nine of the firms that received bailout money paid out billions and billions in bonuses. citigroup alone which suffered losses last year got $45 billion and paid out $5.3 billion in bonuses. yet the white house has been pretty quiet. isn't the president outraged again? >> that's why he has supported things like say on pay, to make sure as we go forward at least shareholders are minding the store. we also did appoint a special master there in the treasury department to take these decisions out of political hands, someone who is supposed to be watching those firms that are getting extensive government and taxpayer money. he's certainly going to be making recommendations. >> will you assure us it won't happen again this year? remember what mr. gfineberg's description was. what he's working at is sort of balancing off the, are they going to be able to retain talent with our sense of outrage, with our sense of what's reasonable, with the sense of are we encouraging too much risk taking? we're going to trust him. >> moving on, one of the presid
, the prime minister of kenya. >>> when barack obama came into office, many in america and around the world hoped he would breathe life into the prospects between a peace deal between israel and the palestinians. obama quickly appointed a man on the issue, former senator george mitchell, who had negotiated the peace accords in the islands. it is considered by some to be the most right wing in memory, as is the new government. the prime minister netanyahu had been fiercely critical of any kind of palestinian state. his former minister had called for what some had characterized as leaders from israel. obama and netanyahu have clashd to expand settlements over the west bank. there has been some forward movement. he did accept the idea of a palestinian state about a month ago. there were some caveats. on the palestinian side, they are becoming somewhat less corrupt and more competent. they seem to have less support, even in gaza, where talks continue to be hellish. isn't the real story not these talks with the palestinians but military action against iran? the former u.n. ambassador john bolton
the reality of the recession. our ali velshi is taking the pulse of america in the heartland. ththththththththththth >>> sarah palin detailing her claims about so-called death pams in a health care overall. we are back with jessica yellin who is going to give us some background. >>> somebody somebody stepped down as governor but that has not stopped her from jumping first into the health care debate. last night, she was at it again posting on facebook what looked like a term paper complete with 11 foot notes. she is quoting statements about rationed care by left-winging columnists and democrats. she was defending a claim she made last week that if health care reform passes, her parents or baby would be required to, quote, stand in front of obama's death panel so his bureaucrats can decide whether they are worthy of health care. fact check? not true. there is no panel that would decide whether the weak live or die. even some of palin's republican colleagues are slamming her for promoting a rumor that they call nuts and they say will, quote, begin gin up fear. she is referring
him a little less busy. he started out bringing health care to the jungles of central america before realize is, hey, maybe there was help desperately needed here in this country. >> stop broan brock is the foun remote area medical, a nonprofit volunteer corps of doctors, nurses and dental professionals. he joins us from knoxville, tennessee. stan, thank you for being with us. what an interesting story. you did this, because you were injured. you were in south america somewhere and you needed medical attention, and it was 26 days on foot to get to a doctor? >> yes, yes, 26 days on foot. and so it makes you think, you know, when you're lying there all smashed up somewhere, and there's no doctor in sight. and of course, that unfortunate is really the case for 49 million americans who might as well be in the amazon jungle for their likelihood of being able to access health care in this country. >> is that really true? if you are injured in this country, it is federal law. you walk into an emergency room and you have to be treated is the law. isn't the issue here that it's costly to have
on the cnn express across america talking to you about your health coverage and what you want to see in reform. ali, what are they telling you? >> reporter: and i'm here in kansas city, missouri, with the cnn express. i've been hearing a lot from people across the country. we've started in georgia, went through tennessee, kentucky, illinois, missouri, and now into kansas and then into iowa. we're finding out what people are feeling about health care. the debate, as we've seen, has been heated in town hall meetings all over the country. when we stopped in paducah, kentucky, i had a very civilized, very normal conversation with some folks about their fears and hopes for health care reform, christine. have a listen to this. >> reporter: we are hearing different things from people wherever we're going but i haven't found too many people around here who are opposed to reforming health care. >> i'm for the idea but i don't think that congress and the president have done a good job of disseminating information. i'm just hearing a lot of talk. >> reporter: what about you? >> i think right no
. >> this is a very different obama than we saw on the campaign. obama of the campaign is there's no red america, no blue america, no republican, no democrat, there's one america. tonight, if what we're hearing is correct, if he does say we're going to cling to the public plan, government-run plan, no matter what he's saying, blue america wins. i'm the president of that america. this government-run plan doesn't have the support in the middle. he's losing democrat support in the senate and thinking of trying to jam this through quickly with 50 votes. >> roy, do you think this is really something they would go ahead with? do you think they're trying to float this idea to put pressure on people to come to an agreement? >> today gibbs said they hadn't decided whether they were going to stop negotiating with the republican cans. all of the signals were sent. kyl saying he wasn't going whip up votes. grassley saying he might not support the thing he was negotiating for. the signals were there and they were saying they weren't sure. when would they be sure? when the support dropped to 29%? i think this
marxism. they feel the united states of america won't be the united states of america anymore. >> i don't totally agree with everything that ed said. i'm not as far to the left as ed is. >> no. but you are an ideologue. >> i am not. >> you are pursuing an agenda. >> absolutely not. >> you're upset because i'm expressing my opinion. >> i think ed shultz put his finger on something that is important. day in and day out. >> finger on something important? >> there are people, lou, i don't want to call any names, but there are broadcasters out there saying day after day after day that white house is preparing is concentration camps. that there are death panels s. >> if anyone is saying that, we should be saying their names. >> who are they? >> michael savage. you hear similar kind of talk from rush limbaugh. >> not similar. you used very specific language. who used that language? >> death panels, all over the place. all over the place. i mean all over the place. seriously. on your station, lou. >> concentration camps? >> they have described them in detail, that order is going to come. >> ans
, but not this time. >>> and he's america's money man. and president obama wants to keep him on the job. mr. obama revealed this morning that he'll nominate federal reserve chair, ben bernanke, nor for a second term, that announcement from martha's vineyard, where the family is vacations came through. he said bernanke has led the u.s. through the worst economic crisis that we've ever faced. he'll have to be confirmed by senate where some lawmakers might not be too happy with his first term. >>> promising news on the housing front, and it's about time. a closely watched index shows home prices have posted their first quarterly increase in 3 years. it was nearly a 3% jump from the first quarter but still down 15% from the second quarter of last year. home prices are now at home levels not seen since early 2003. >>> there's a lot of optimism about the economy in asia, but how about new york? cnn's richard quest joins us once again, but this time not from the front of the new york stock exchange, he's in brooklyn. what have you found there besides the waterfront, my friend? >> reporter: i've joined th
for health care in america. town halls are causing public uproar confusion. al li is curing the country on cnn express. joining us from the missouri state fair. talk about getting the pulse of america, what are you hearing? >> reporter: we have been driving from atlanta to des moines and passed through georgia, tennessee, kentucky, illinois, missouri, heading into kansas and iowa. we're talking to people in places smaller than what would get media coverage about health care. as the health care debate was heating up on tv, we were trying to get a quieter discussion going. there was plenty of disagreement where we went. we ended up in an interesting place, northwestern kentucky on the illinois border. we had a bit of a town hall meeting. one was a democratic candidate who ran in the last election and lost. she had very, very strong views on health care. here is a bit of a taste of what she told us. >> well, my husband and i are two of the 47 million plus that don't have health care. i'm not talking insurance. i want health care. my husband had diabetes and a bout with cancer. what insuran
of air america and dana lohse affiliated with the st. louis tea party. dana, why so much anger, mistrust and misinformation out there? we wonder, has this whole thing devovled to the point where it is unproductive but potentially dangerous? >> i don't think it can be dangerous. congress is sfonsable for setting the tone. congress hasn't allowed for discourse for one of the most important pieces of legislation in american history that is what people are reacting to. they are tired of calling their legislator and leaving a message with an aide. we are seeing people who are flocking there because they have their elected official's ear and they want to express their conditions about the health care legislation. >> ron, what about the argument, this is not organized, but a grassroots movement and deeply concerned about health care. >> that is fine to get involved and it is good to show up at a town hall meeting and have a conversation. you have to have the conversation and have the discussion. many of these people, not all, many of these people are clearly showing up to shut the conversation
to the vfw on america's two foreign wars and the troops who are fighting them. you'll see it live right here in the "newsroom.." >>> two and a half months in the hurricane sen and bill and claude it light up the radar. hello, everyone. i'm kieyra phillips. you're live here in the "cnn newsroom." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> and they fought for you. who fights for them. american veterans focused health care. we're pushing forward on both fronts. a live address to the vfw in this hour and a congressional session of conservative opponents to the health plan. you know we've covered their causes and criseses to tainted equipment at v.a. hospitals. there are people stories, not number stories. we can't ignore numbers like these. almost a million unprocessed claims. if claims are denied it can take a year and a half, sometimes much longer to go through the appeals. factor in a passionate fight to overhaul the nation's health care system and this becomes the scene outside president's adegree. cnn's ed henry joins me live. how does it push into this for reform? we sure know they want it.
of america's top enemies in afghanistan and pakistan. first, it is a "360" exclusive. in her first interview since her sister's return, lisa ling tonight joining us on "360" to talk about what's happened since her sister laura and her colleague, euna lee, came home from north korea. how they're re-adjusting and how euna's 4-year-old daughter hana is doing now that mommy is finally home. former president bill children securing their release. he spoke publicly about that trip for the first time today. but frankly, said very little. >> i wanted those young women to be able to come home. and i wanted our two countries to have the ability to decide where to go from here. it would be wrong for me to say any more. the young women can speak for themselves about their experiences. the pictures were worth a million words yesterday. i'm glad i could be of some help. >> pictures which seemed to capture the heart of a nation. since then, both families have been out of the public eye. tonight, though, lisa ling has been kind enough to give us a window into the moments since that plane touched down and som
and right for america. here in montana, we also know the value of an honest word. let me tell you, there is plenty of dishonesty out there about what health care reform will or will not do. now, you've all seen the tv show, mythbusters, right? i have been going around the state busting myths about health care, whether it is bogus information about rationing care, cutting benefits for sen yu y yurs or interfering with the doctor/patient relationship. these myths are being busted right open. they are just plain balogna. that's why our president is here to talk with us and help us spread the truth about health care reform. it will lower costs. it will give -- make sure every american has access to quality affordable health care. [ applause ] in closing, i want to thank all of you, the people i work for, for coming out today, for getting engaged and taking the initiative to get involved. that is the cornerstone of our democracy. that is why our nation remains the greatest on earth. >>> there you go. we are going to try and get that picture. it's almost like the interference you get fr
health care system in america, including the so-called government option, which we believe would lead to a government takeover of the health care system in america. >> supporters warn that the status quo means too much control by insurance companies. >> congress and the president will remove the insurance industry from coming between the patient and his or her doctor. >> would americans rather have the government or insurance companies make difficult health care decisions? they're divided. democrats prefer government, republicans prefer insurance companies. should health care decisions be made by government or by insurance companies? a lot of people hear that question and wonder, yikes. those are the choices? lou? >> yikes. another poll out today from quinnipiac, bill, also showing a dramatic shift on the handling of the president's health care proposals, from just a month ago. 42% disapproved. now 52% disapprove. that's a dramatic change. what's driving it, bill? >> it certainly is dramatic change. and it could reflect an increasing volume of criticism. though, i should point out tha
that has always moved america forward nap means once again having the best educated, highest skilled workforce in the world. that means a health care system that makes it possible for entrepreneurs to innovate and businesses to compete without being saddled with skyrocketing insurance costs. >> reporter: there you have it. essentially what we are likely going to be hearing from president obama in the days and weeks to come. once again, t.j., trying to make his case and make his argument, that health care reform is an issue that cannot wait. that lawmakers have to tackle it sooner rather than later. t.j.? >> yeah, elaine. we know the president's making his kashgs but seems like the other side of the debate, you could almost argue, other democrats in a lot of ways. where do the republicans fit in and what do they have to say? just seems like this debate is going back and forth between democrats an democrats. >> reporter: you're absolutely right. a lot of this, deep divisions with the democratic party over this. conservative blue dog we heard about before, as well as progressive. for th
kennedy, a man who fought passionately and pragmatically in the senate. >> he challenged our america, and our teddy changed america. >> people have called teddy and me the odd couple, which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friends, warren hatch of utah and christopher dodd of connecticut, share their personal memories. plus senator maria wall of washington on the post-kennedy debate for office. and in our american dispatch, the kennedy connection to boston sports dynasty. i talked to the president and ceo of the red sox, larry laquino. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. senator andrews gets the last word. "state of the union" report for sunday, august 30. >>> a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs and someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral of senator edward kennedy in boston yesterday. president obama led the eulogy in saying goodbye at arlington cemetary. here is a reflection on senator kennedy's life, oren hatch of utah and senator christopher dodd. se
of the minds i think on some additional regulation. not a global regulator. the united states of america should never agree to have an international regulator that tells it what to do and what not to do with its economy. but there are some things, i think, that looks now like they're going to come out of this meeting. some saw a regulation of tax haven is a healthy thing. that would be a healthy thing globally. some regulation, perhaps, of hedge funds and things like that. so i think we'll probably see that, and i think the obama administration will be going along with that. >> what about the core financial issue, which is what to do about these banks? you wrote an article in the financial times in which you basically remembered the experience of japan's last decade when you were in high government office, and you pointed out that the key problem was they didn't deal with the bad banks fast enough and decisively enough. they kept some of these zombie banks alive, well enough not to die but not well enough to actually give loans. it does seem like there may be so
geico's the third-largest car insurance company in america? nice tidbit there. boss: exactly. and i've been thinking, looking a bit more businesslike might help too. gecko: oh my. uhhh, no it's, what's, what's the word... vogeico. 15 minutes could save you 15 percent or more on car insurance. >>> so this is what everyone has been e-mailing us asking us to do, at least me. let's cut through the health care rhetoric right now. just the facts here. angie is here from a nonpartisan fact checking group. angie, let's jump right into it. my first one here is that all of -- let's just say there are a couple of different proposals. i think there's like three in the house, two to the senate, and they're all just proposals. no bill yet. there's no bill. all of the proposals include no pre-existing conditions and health care for all americans. true? >> they all include the no preconditions and they all expand medicaid, which is a health program run by the government for the poor. and we essentially have a bill in the house that three committees have injure dis ovju over and we're waiting for o
. >>> congress heads home to face america divided over health care changes. to discuss the policy and political divides with two key senators. john cornyn of texas, dick durbin of illinois. >>> and the big gap between the president's approval rating and his handling of the big issues. we take america's pulse with two top polls. >>> and the recession puts a squeeze on many community support organizations just when struggling parents and hungry children need the help most. the state of the union report for sunday, august 9th. >>> president obama heads to mexico tonight for a summit with the leaders of mexico and canada, a reminder of the mounting international pressures even as he struggles to sell his top domestic priority health care here at home. >>> greater cooperation fighting mexico's deadly drug world. and elsewhere on the stage, afghanistan, iran, and north korea all present the white house with difficult policy choices. the full and often frustrating list for the president and for his ambassador to the united nations susan rice. welcome. >> good to be with you. >> let's start with iran,
the president took no active part in the campaign, he left in the middle of one of the america's cup races to vote at boston's joy street police station. he had no comment on his brother's victory but political observers were quick to point out that the younger kennedy's race in november will be more than a local issue. >> a man who cares. edward m. kennedy endorsed democratic candidate for the united states senate. >> too many of our senior citizens are being forced to choose between neglecting their ailments or being p auchlt perized by them. >> vote for edward m. kennedy, the endorsed democratic candidate for the united states senate. >> the congress convenience. there are some new faces on capitol hill. among them are 12 new senators. of most interest is senator edward "ted" kennedy, the third brother to achieve success in the national political arena. >> from dallas texas, president kennedy died at 1:00 p.m. central standard time. 2:00 eastern standard time. some 38 minutes ago. >> making a final stop on his tour of ireland, senator edward kennedy finds 100,000 people in the streets t
, small businesses are the engine of economic growth in america. there's no mandate in the bill that requires those that have a payroll of up to now over $500,000 to provide health insurance and pay at least 72% of it. and if you don't, there's an 8% tax on that payroll. the this is going to raise the cost of employment. leave their employees no choice but to go to the government option. >> let me ask you this question. i just got to the core of what's called this public option. this government option. a government-run insurance company, if you will, to compete with the private insurance companies. are you afraid that these private insurance companies, whether blue cross/blue shield, united health care, whatever, can't compete with a government-run insurance company? >> wolf, nobody in the private sector can compete with the government. and that's because there's no cost of capital. the government sets the rules. the government sets the prices. and so you can't compete. you can't win. it's 1,018 pages. that ought to be enough to tell you that this is a giant government bureaucra
. the united states, saying we are responsibility for some of the violence because of america's hunger for drugs and the guns crossing from the united states to mexico. the mexican officials want to actually see some more aid, some money here. it was more than $1 billion that former president bush dedicated to fighting the drug effort. $100 million has been delayed in fighting that effort because some members of congress say there are human rights violations that are taking place inside mexico from its own military. they don't want the funds to flow to mexico until that is resolved. third, it's the economy. they will take a look at what is happening, what is the state of the u.s. economy and the recession because it has such a tremendous impact on the mexican economy as well as the canadian one. don? >> suzanne malveaux traveling with the president throughout this trip and reporting for cnn. >>> the summit is taking place across a backdrop of rising violence. michael ware is in guadalajara and i asked him about that. >> reporter: if you look at the grand scheme of this drug war it is n
. >> in robert bork's america, there is no room at the inn for blacks and no place in the constitution for women. and in our america, there should be no seat on the supreme court for robert bork. and i urge the committee and senate to reject the nomination of mr. bork. >> so the vote 58-42 against robert bork. his nomination to the u.s. supreme court has been defeated. >> i want to sign a civil rights bill. i will not sign a quota bill. >> quota schmotas. foet iquotas are not the issue. job discrimination is the issue. >> senator kennedy eloquently said quota schmota. and he predicts a veto will be overwritten. >> time to provide equal opportunity to women and minorities no ifs, ands and buts, and no water-downed compromises either. >> president bush is ready to this country unilaterally into war in the persian gulf without the support of the country and without the support of the american people. i feel like i have to wind myself up just to get out of bed. then...well... i have to keep winding myself up to deal with the sadness, the loss of interest, the trouble concentrating, the lack of energ
america," which is very odd, the last time we remember "god bless america" being sung there was after 9/11. so that's going to be a scene that will no doubt be quite emotional. and the family members we expect to get out of the vehicles and to senator's staff to say thank you one last time. but this was his home and it is their lance chaft last chance t good-bye to him. >> our live coverage will continue. we will talk to paul begala. we will get the insider's look what it was like inside the halls. be right back in a moment. racheting up slowly ) ( whooshing, riders cheering ) this is my verizon small business specialist, tom. now, i know the catering business but when i walked in here i wasn't sure what i needed. i'm not sure what i need. tom showed me how to use mifi to get my whole team working online, on location. i was like, "woah". woah ! only verizon wireless has small business specialists in every store to help you do business better. you're like my secret ingredient. come in today and connect up to five devices on one 3g connection. now only $99.99 there's no way to hide it. si
, outrageous. >> you didn't want it to happen again, and news this week, it did. citigroup, bank of america, nine of the firms that received bailout money paid out billions and billions in bonuses. citigroup alone, which suffered losses last year got $45 billion and paid out $5.3 billion in bonuses and yet the white house has been pretty quiet. is the president outraged again? >> you know, certainly the president is very concerned about executive compensation in general. that's part of why he supported things like say on pay, again, to make sure as we go forward that at least shareholders are minding the store. we also did appoint a special master there in the treasury department to take these decisions out of political hands, someone who is is supposed to be watching those firms that are getting extensive government and taxpayer money. and he's certainly going to be making recommendations. >> will you assure us it won't happen again this year? >> remember what mr. fineberg's job description? he's trying to walk a line. weapon want them to earn money, pay the taxpayers back. absolutely what
inspired our america. robert kennedy challenged our america. and our teddy changed america. >> people called teddy and me the odd couple, which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friends, orrin hatch of utah and christopher dodd of connecticut share their personal memories. >>> plus senator maria cantwell of washington on the post-kennedy health care debate in the congress. and my exclusive interview with the late senator's nephew robert f. kennedy jr. and in our american dispatch, the kennedy connection to boston's sports dynasty. i talk to the president and ceo of the red sox. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. louisiana senator mary landrieu gets the last word. "the state of the union" report for sunday august 30th. a champion for those who had none. a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs. someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral yesterday. president obama led the nation in saying good-bye to the 77-year-old senator who was laid to rest near his brothers j
in america. thank you, sir. >> you bet. >> you heard the young man there. he's saying, you know, people are accusing us of being racist and that's not so. >> well, you know, not everyone who opposes the president's plan or him as an individual obviously is acting on the basis of racism. my argument is that there is a background noise of the hostility that is, i think, about what i guess i would call white racial resentment. let me give you an example. we know in missouri the other day a white man goes, assaults a black woman, rips up her poster of rosa parks and receives a huge ovation from literally hundreds of white folks in attendance for doing that, and then as they haul her away, the police in the room, the security, haul her away, these white folks are applauding. she was assaulted, a picture of rosa parks ripped up. there are white folks in the room with posters that refer to the president by the "n" word. no one seemed to care about that. secondly, we've got right wing radio talk show hosts who for months now have been playing the white racial resentment card to get their forces
america. robert kennedy challenged our america. and our teddy changed america. >> people have called teddy and me the odd couple. which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friend, orrin hatch of utah, and christopher dodd of connecticut share their personal memories. plus, senator maria cantwell of washington on the post kennedy health care debate in congress. and exclusive interview with robert f. kennedy, jr. and in our "american dispatch", the kennedy connection to boston sports dynasty. i talk to the president and ceo, larry luccino. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. mary landrieu gets the last word. >>> a champion for those who had none. a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs. and someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral of senator edward kennedy in boston yesterday. president obama led the nation in saying good-bye to the 77-year-old senator laid to rest by brothers john and robert. hear the reflections on the senator's life and work, senator orrin hatch of
to be something perfect. so -- and we've got to remember, too. look this really isn't a humanitarian megs. america did not go to afghanistan for al true wis sick and national security interest. that's going to have to be the goal of the campaign. and so how is the fight going? i mean, early on we heard from u.s. commanders on the ground and saying, look, there's not enough afghan troops in this. >> there's not. they are doubling the size of the afghan army. as i last saw it, it was a hodge podge of different foot soldiers from different world wars. and when i last saw them, he actually lies to the back home. so this is going to be difficult. it's true, the momentum right now is the taliban and in a war like this, if you are not winning, you are almost losing. america may not lose it but they may not win it. the true victory, it's going to have to come with some kind of a functioning system, a decentralized system. >> u.s. commanders say there's not a true military system. >> and they did right. sorry to pardon the pump but they did right. the solution is not going to be in the trenches. you've got
some in latin america who have said that the united states is not acted strongly enough to return president zelaya to power. i wonder if you could talk a little bit about how you feel about what the united states should be doing or could be doing to restore democratic order in honduras. and prime minister harper, a few months ago the homeland security secretary of the united states went to canada, or at least aggravated canadian sensibilities when she compared the canadian border to the mexican border. and i wonder what you think about that and how you feel about the united states using some of the important strategies adopted on the southern border in the north. thank you. >> that's all? >> that's all, mr. president. >> well, first of all, i don't know if you're doing prognosticating about the midterm electilections which arr a year away. i and we'll do just fine. and i think when all is said on health care reform, the american people are going to be glad that we acted to change an unsustainable system so more people have coverage and we're bending the cost curve and we're gettin
, republican sarah palin wrote the america i know and love is not one in which my parents or my baby with down syndrome will have to stand in front of obama's death panel. so his bureaucrats can decide whether they are worthy of health care. such a system is downright evil. in his weekly address, president obama fired back at opponents. >> and let me start by dispelling the outlandish rumors that reform will promote euthanasia or cut medicaid or bring about a government takeover of health care. that's simply not true. >> this week the president heads to new hampshire for a town hall meeting on health care. later, he'll visit montana, home state of max baucus, a key democrat trying to negotiate a deal on health care reform. elaine quijano, cnn, the white house. >> and of course, we do want to hear your thoughts on health care. send us your i-reports at ireport.com. >>> president obama holding talks at the top of the hour with the leaders of canada and mexico. the north american summit taking place in guadalajara is focusing on the fight against swine flu. plus regional trade issues and the drug
national party. >> i have come here tonight to stand with you to change america, to restore its future, to rise to our best ideals, and to elect barack obama president of the united states. >> senator ted kennedy in his own words. i'm joined now by wolf blitzer from washington, d.c. this morning. wolf, you have made a career of following politics obviously. this is a very, very big day and one that many people will be certainly very sad about. >> it's one day that all of us were bracing for over the past year since he was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. we knew it would come and we knew it would come relatively quickly, given the state of that cancer. he did go to duke university for medical treatment for surgery but the end was obvious to all who studied what was going on and we knew this day would come, a very sad day indeed for all of us. president obama is reacting to the news this morning of senator kennedy's death. our white house correspondent dan lothian is in martha's vineyard where the obamas are vacationing this week. clearly, dan, the president is upset given not only
of america actually has a solution to help them out with their cards. i listen. that's the first thing i do is listen. you know what, what happened? what put you in this situation? and everyone's situation is different. we always want to make sure that we're doing what's best for our cardholders. i'll go through some of his monthly expenses, if he has a mortgage payment, if he pays rent. and then i'll use all that information to try and see what kind of a payment he financially can handle. i want to help you. bank of america wants to help you through this difficult time. when they come to you and they say thank you, aj, for helping me with this problem, that's where we get our joy from. that's what motivates us everyday. >>> higher education doesn't come cheap and if you're a parent or a student or know a parent or student, we'll show you how to find a perfect college for your budget. joining us now, the author of the princeton' view's best 371 colleges. you actually interview students to find out what they think and they're the ones who are living this thing, so they are a great source. le
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